Review: Radioactive Man & Ara-U - Plastic Attack (Asking For Trouble)

From Hackney and Hastings to the warehouse floor.

Review: Radioactive Man & Ara-U - Plastic Attack (Asking For Trouble)

From Hackney and Hastings to the warehouse floor.

Keith Tenniswood is a legendary figure in the UK. Since sinking his teeth into electro and hip hop as a curious teenager, the producer better known as Radioactive Man has established himself as one of the most respected and consistent electro artists on the planet. Gaining recognition as one half of the Two Lone Swordsmen alongside another of Blighty’s best, Andrew Weatherall, Tenniswood has gone on to prove his Midas touch. Releasing under countless aliases on esteemed imprints such as Warp and Rotters Golf Club, as well as Control Tower, the label he founded with Dexorcist, Tenniswood has collaborated with some of the best in the business: Billy Nasty, Mat Carter and Bass Junkie to name a few. His latest partner in crime is Ara-U, a producer whose story starts amongst the sound systems of 90s Venezuelan raves. The latest release on Tenniswood’s Asking For Trouble, Plastic Attack came out at the end of June.

Opening track "Datatheft" pairs bouncy kick drums with wonky synthwork to produce an old-school number with some serious attitude. A grumbling, heavy bassline projects the track along with purpose, before some head-spinning 303 goodness joins the party. A2 "Failure to Communicate" is a true electro funk beat, complete with shimmering sci-fi keys, a cracking snare and another lively acid line. On the flipside, "Daytime Robbery’s" aggressive 808 kicks and low-humming bassline team up with some expert percussion and extra-terrestrial synth flares to create a dubbed-out medley of textures. The duo go deep on this B1 banger. Rounding off the EP, "The Last Waltz" showcases another oddball combination of acid, drums and bass. Constantly shapeshifting, the tune ventures through fuzzy 303 melodies, funky keys and distorted, fuzzy low-ends.


Buy your copy HERE.

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