Influences: Sally Rodgers

One half of magical duo, A Man Called Adam, talks prominent records.

Influences: Sally Rodgers

One half of magical duo, A Man Called Adam, talks prominent records.

If you've ever been to Ibiza and found yourself watching the sun set gracefully in the distance then there's every chance that you'll of been soundtracked or serenaded by the beautiful, balearic popcraft of A Man Called Adam. The prolific dance music come balearic crossover act has been a prominent presence throughout music for decades now and has observed an industry chop and change in the blink of an eye. They however have remained true to their own sound and as such have amassed a reputable following from those who like to dance and dream beyond the realms of their own lives. 

Sally Rodgers is one half of the magical duo, she has spent many years involved in the project and has spent a lifetime on the dancefloor. She knows the ins and outs better than anyone and has helped forge a succesful career as a result. 

This month the pair will play at Campo Sancho festival, an event for which they are perfectly matched. The soundtrack to an evening night amidst the wild fields. 

We invited her to pick influential music ahead of their appearance below...


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John Cage About Silence

Back in the mid naughties Steve and I started to listen to more experimental, electroacoustic music. We’d always used field recordings and found sounds in our music but we went deeper into the world of music concréte and art music. We saw Stockhausen perform Oktophonie at Billingsgate market, which was a very grand affair, and he was like a sonic wizard, taking the audience on a magic carpet ride, teaching us how to listen to sound in space and time. It was a big milestone for us and sent us down a new road in terms of the music we make. We read more and studied the history experimental music – I suppose trying to find our own place in that continuum. John Cage’s work and theories were also important to us and I love his ideas about music, sound and laughter. He was both cheerful and very serious. That resonates with me.

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